About Reciprosody

Reciprosody is an open repository of prosodically annotated speech.

Currently, prosody researchers lack a simple way to share their annotated data. This lack: 1 limits our ability to test robust supervised techniques for automatic prosody detection; 2 makes it difficult to compare performance across publications that operate on private corpora; and 3 puts the burden on the creators of a resource to maintain and distribute their data. The lack of shareable data is particularly worrisome in our field, since prosodic annotation, as we all know, is a very onerous and time-consuming task.

We have developed a way to address these issues, by making it easy for individuals and groups to share prosodically annotated data, for any language and using any annotation scheme. Reciprosody serves to simplify the dissemination process for corpus owners, while simplifying the process of locating material for researchers. Corpora of all sizes, using any annotation standard, in any language are welcome.

All material shared on Reciprosody is distributed freely for non-commercial research. By default, all hosted material is covered by the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share-Alike 3.0 License. Other licenses that allow for open dissemination are used on the request of the owner of the hosted material. All rights to hosted material remain with the owner of the material.

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number #1205445. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

Version 0.3.2

Credits



Andrew Rosenberg

Julia Hirschberg

Stefanie Shattuck-Hufnagel

Syed Reza

Andrew Rosenberg

I am an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Queens College (CUNY), and a member of the Doctoral Faculty of the Computer Science and Linguistics programs at the CUNY Graduate Center. I completed my Ph.D. at Columbia University in 2009. I lead the Speech Lab @ Queens College.

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Julia Hirschberg

I am a professor in the Department of Computer Science at Columbia University. I received my PhD in Computer Science from the University of Pennsylvania, after previously doing a PhD in sixteenth-century Mexican social history at the University of Michigan and teaching history at Smith. I worked at Bell Laboratories and AT&T Laboratories -- Research from 1985-2003 as a Member of Technical Staff and a Department Head, creating the Human-Computer Interface Research Department there.

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Stefanie Shattuck-Hufnagel

Stefanie Shattuck-Hufnagel investigates the cognitive structures and processes involved in speech production planning, particularly at the level of speech sound sequencing. Her work with speech error patterns and with the acoustic analyses of prosody has implications for cognitive models of speech production and for phonological theory, as well as applications in speech recognition and synthesis.

sshuf@mit.edu

Syed Reza

I am a web application developer and software enthusiast.

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Reciprosody is hosted and maintained by the Speech Lab @ Queens College

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